One of the most solemn places in America are the 624 acres of Arlington National Cemetery. More than 400,000 men and women who gave the ultimate and final measure of devotion to this nation are entombed there. They have been buried there since the American Civil War and every conflict either declared or not since.

The quietness of Arlington is emotional and powerful. The names etched into simple marble headstones. Twenty five more are buried there every day. This year, Wreaths Across America continued the tradition to place a wreath at every single marker. Every fallen hero is remembered no matter where they fell or how long ago. The wreaths are a measure of honor and respect.

However, as the purge of American history continues in many corners of the country our national cemetery is not immune to this kind of attack. The grave markers are distinguished with Christian Crosses and Jewish Stars of David. Sadly in 2017 that means even the most hallowed ground in America can be stained by those who think they have the right to erase any symbols of faith.

I wrote a series of articles a few years ago about things that would be gone in 50 years. I have been adding items along the way. If this nation continues down the path of political correctness and identity politics one of the things that will no longer be with us are those crosses and stars.

The misguided argument of the separation of church and state will be rammed down the throats of a nation that has been hijacked by wild-eyed leftists in too many places of our lives. There is no such thing as the separation of church and state to be found anywhere in the Constitution. I defy you to show me the passage. It simply isn’t there. Activist judges have instead put forth their own ideals and embraced the so-called establishment clause of the First Amendment but they do so at the demise of the Free Exercise clause. The latest people to be victimized by this travesty of Constitutional law could be those that gave their lives to defend the very document that is being perverted to strip their headstones of their symbols of faith.