It's an interesting thing. A discussion of "roundabouts" is sort of a microcosm of our society today. Not only does it spotlight how divided we are, it also shows how tiny little remarks can lead to tangential arguments, some far off the topic at hand.

What this is, right now, is the City of Battle Creek on its Facebook page announced it has a day-long Q&A session on Thursday, April 15th. 11 am - 6pm. This is regarding a proposed roundabout at North Ave and Emmett Street in Battle Creek, near Bronson Battle Creek Hospital and near Kellogg Community College. It's an opportunity for locals to ask questions. Judging by the reaction on several Facebook pages, including the City of Battle Creek's, there are some people who aren't enamored with the idea, especially the cost.

Here's some examples:

David A Branham says "Stupid don't do it wrong wrong wrong will mess things up totally."

Agreeing is Marianne Wells, who wrote "This will create a definite nightmare for people; especially, senior citizens that have to drive to the hospital. Even in Kalamazoo I've heard people say it's too confusing. Please don't put this in."

Debbie Yother Blaniar wrote: "Don’t need it, waste of money just because a city worker is really pushing it, we aren’t like other city’s in Michigan."

From the radio station's Facebook page, an argument that's not about money. Jeremy Lahr wrote "A round about without signals is going to put the hospital employees and others in more danger. Drivers will be more concerned with incoming traffic and trying to navigate than looking for pedestrians. The hospital should look into more parking for employees on the hospital grounds and not off campus. This is a problem for the hospital to sort not the city and city tax dollars.

And one final comment, not being sure if this is straight-forward or sarcastic. but from David Hamilton: "One of the best things man has created."

Again, if you want to speak your onions, Thursday, April 15th is the day to do it.

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