At what point are the good people of this great country going to say enough is enough.

At what point are the good people of this great country going to take the advice of the character named Howard Beale, played by Peter Finch, in the 1976 movie titled Network and:

Get up right now and go to the window. Open it, and stick your head out, and yell: I'M AS MAD AS HELL, AND I'M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE!

The Tempe Officers Association wrote on Twitter that the six officers stopped at a Starbucks coffee shop before their shift and ordered drinks.  A “barista” walked up to them and told them that a customer "did not feel safe" with their presence in the store. They officers say that they were told to "move out of the customer's line of sight or to leave."

In a statement the Tempe Officers Association said:

Yesterday, on Independence Day, six Tempe police officers stopped by the Starbucks at Scottsdale Road and McKellips for coffee. The officers paid for their drinks and stood together having a cup of coffee before their long Fourth of July shift. They were approached by a barista, who knew one of the officers by name, because he is a regular at that location. The barista said that a customer “did not feel safe” because of the police presence. The barista asked the officers to move out of the customer’s line of sight or to leave. Disappointed, the officers did in fact leave. This treatment of public safety workers could not be more disheartening. While the barista was polite, making such a request at all was offensive. Unfortunately, such treatment has become all too common in 2019. We know this is not a national policy at Starbucks Corporate and we look forward to working collaboratively with them on this important dialogue.

“Move out of the customer's line of sight or to leave” you have got to be kidding me.  I guess it does not take much intelligence for Starbucks to hire you.  What would make you think you can go to anyone and tell them another customer does not want you in their line or sight?

What if a white supremacist tells a Starbucks “barista” that they “did not feel safe" with the presence of a group of black people.  Will the “barista” ask the group of black people to move out of their line of sight or leave?

What if a black supremacist tells a Starbucks “barista” that they “did not feel safe" with the presence of a group of white people.  Will the “barista” ask the group of white people to move out of their line of sight or leave?

Examples like the one above are endless, how about skinny people not wanting overweight people in their line of sight. At what point does your rights infringe on other people's rights?

Starbucks executive vice president and president of U.S. Retail Rossann Williams released a statement on the Starbucks website referencing the above incident. In her statement she offered an apology to the Tempe Officers Association and the officers:

"On behalf of Starbucks, I want to sincerely apologize to you all for the experience that six of your officers had in our store on July 4”

It is time for good people to say “I’m as mad as hell, and I am not going to take this anymore” and to do that either do not vote for the ideology that cultivates this type of behavior and attitude, that is Democratic/Liberal, or do not enable this behavior with your vote.

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