The community of White Rock in Michigan’s Thumb is most likely overlooked by many, but the thing that makes it stick out over many other hidden, or ‘lost’ Michigan villages, is the tale of the White Rock.

In Huron County just off the shore of Lake Huron is a large white boulder. The village got its name from this rock, which was used by the Native Americans as a territorial marker defining the boundaries of the Chippewa, Ottawa, Potawatomi, and Wyandot tribes.

One of the legends about the rock concerns a group of early settlers. They decided they were going to have a little party on the rock, but were warned by the tribes that it was a sacred place, not to be disrespected. Ignoring the warning, the men went anyway. That night, as they were still partying into the late hours, a storm came up. A lightning bolt struck the boulder, killing everyone on it.

So now is the rock cursed or haunted?
I guess you’d have to go there and find out for yourself.

As for the village of White Rock, in the early 1800’s Edwin Petit moved his Shebeon Creek Trading Post to the area. Thanks to his trades, the community began to thrive and in 1850 White Rock had its own post office.

The Great Thumb Fire of 1871 blazed through White Rock, destroying the businesses and homes. Even though the town was rebuilt, it never regained its former glory and the area remains with very little establishments and just a few homes.

At one time, the boulder was “large enough to accommodate 16 square dancers.” Nowadays, thanks to more lightning strikes, and the eroding qualities of Lake Huron weather, the rock has diminished to 12 square feet. Some say it was also used for target practice for bombers during World War II.

There is a roadside park where you can picnic and walk down to the shore to see the boulder, sitting all alone out in the water. An historical marker is also in the park.

It's just another little-known Michigan historical area that you should check out someday soon!